Behavioral Sciences

Using GoReact to Enhance Therapist Skills Through Deliberate Practice

A webinar featuring Dr. Adam Jones from Texas Woman’s University

Dr. Adam Jones, Assistant Professor at Texas Woman’s University, explains how deliberate practice, supported by directive feedback, improves the effectiveness and efficiency of psychotherapy education and training.

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Cherokee Lee:

Hi, everyone. Thank you so much for joining today’s GoReact webinar on Deliberate Practice. My name is Cherokee and I’m a GoReact employee. And I’m so thrilled that all of you are here with us today and especially thrilled to be announcing our presenter for today, Adam Jones from Texas Women’s University. Adam, would you like to tell us a little bit about yourself before we get started?

Adam Jones:

Yeah, I’d be happy to. My name’s Adam Jones. I’m an assistant professor at Texas Women’s University. It’s actually the largest institution in the country, primarily for women. We’re in the Dallas Fort Worth area, a little north of Dallas and Fort Worth in a little city called Denton. I’ve been here about four years and one of my primary research interests is looking at therapists, effectiveness, and how to make more effective therapists. So this is an interesting marriage between my research interests and also the interest of GoReact and how that’s been beneficial for us. So I’ll get into that a little bit more once I get going.

Cherokee Lee:

Awesome. Thank you so much. We’re so happy to have you here. I’ve actually had the privilege of working with Adam in the last few weeks and months and know that he is full of insights. So I know that this is going to be a really enriching conversation. If you are new to our webinars, I did just want to talk about a couple of housekeeping items. First, Adam will speak to us for about 30 minutes and then we’ll have a live Q&A for 15 minutes at the end, roughly, give or take. And then if you would like to leave a question, you’re welcome to do that throughout the duration of the presentation. Just make sure that you do it at the bottom of the live feed, where it says Q&A so that we can make sure to answer your question at the end.

Cherokee Lee:

There’s also a really cool upvote feature. So if you see a question that you really want answered, make sure to click a thumbs up so that we can get to it at the end. We also really want to encourage you to use the chat. This is a place of learning, and we just want to engage with each other and learn from each other and especially talk about this important topic, which is deliberate practice. So be sure to use the chat. We’ll be checking there and just engaging with you there. We would like to get to know you a little bit better as an audience. So to start, we do have a couple of polling questions, excuse me, that should be popping up on your screen here in just a sec. Yep. Looks like it’s up. Go ahead and answer that whenever you’re ready.

Cherokee Lee:

Great. I see some answers coming through here. I’m just going to read the questions as they come in. “Have you heard of this topic of deliberate practice as it relates to the psychotherapy field?” And the second question is, “Have you ever used GoReact before?” So I’ll just give you one more second. Great. So it looks like, Adam, in the first question-

Adam Jones:

Oh, this is nice. I can see it. Yeah.

Cherokee Lee:

Oh, you can see it. Oh, I don’t even need to tell you.

Adam Jones:

I don’t know if everybody else can see it, but it looks like we’re about half and half-

Cherokee Lee:

Both questions, yeah.

Adam Jones:

Between those who have GoReact, haven’t used GoReact or are familiar with deliberate practice or not familiar. So I’ll try to balance that in the presentation.

Cherokee Lee:

Great. Well, thank you so much. We’re so happy to know you a little bit better. Without further ado, Adam, take it away.

Adam Jones:

Okay. I’ll share my screen here and we’ll get started. My contact information is here. I can send it over the chat at some point, if anybody else has further questions as we’re going along. But what I want to do today is talk about some common challenges in psychotherapy education, talk about some new approaches to training and development of therapists and going over the use of GoReact specifically with graduate students and how this can be a useful tool for instructors and supervisors in a variety of different settings. So maybe as a disclaimer, I’m not getting paid by GoReact to be here and I don’t know, maybe I should get a gift card or something, but I’m not a paid employee of GoReact.

Adam Jones:

Like I said, I’m just a university faculty member, but I was actually referred to GoReact from a friend of mine and they recommended its use. They had said they had been using it in their program. I knew just through listening to the description that it would be a big influence for what I was hoping to do in our program. The first thing that really caught my attention was this idea of being able to review videos and be able to give timestamped feedback to students about their therapy work, about their role plays, about whatever they might be doing in their therapy programs and use that as a tool to improve their skills and abilities. It addressed some of the challenges that I had as a faculty member. So I’ll go over some of the usefulness of that as we go forward here, but I really am open to questions and comments as we go along because I’d like this to be beneficial to you all.

Adam Jones:

So I want to give a little bit of a background about deliberate practice. This is one kind of useful way that we’ve been able to use GoReact and it’s really impacted the way I work with my students and train them. So let me ask, if you wouldn’t mind in the chat to take a second, I’d be interested for you all, I’m hoping some of you may or may not be affiliated with psychotherapy programs or working with psychology students or training therapists, but I’m curious in your experience, what do you think indicates that a graduate level therapist will be a successful therapist? How do you know when they’re ready to graduate? What do you look for to evaluate their improvement and that they are going to have an impact on the people they work with?

Adam Jones:

So take a second and share your thoughts in the chat with the others, if you’d be willing. Let’s see, ability to form a therapeutic alliance, develop a case for formulation and implement a change plan. Great. Ben Ogles of BYU. I’m familiar with that name, but I don’t know, maybe there are multiple Ben Ogles out there. Let’s see, their ability to join with clients and create a strong therapeutic alliance. Good. Their ability to conceptualize cases, can demonstrate specific counseling skills to a certain level. Great. Evidence based answer, would be high facilitative interpersonal skills. Good. We’ll touch on the FIS a little bit here. Of course, there are many other ethical professional skills. Yes, this is a big question that certainly can’t be summarized in a very short answer but the good news that I think is important to know is that graduate level therapists are effective therapists.

Adam Jones:

So we have some decent outcome data that demonstrates that even graduate level trainees are providing effective therapeutic services for their clients. In fact, some literature, that we’ll get into here in a second, also can demonstrate that for graduate students, it may be as good as it gets. So there’s some really interesting research. This landmark study by Goldberg in 2016 and there was actually just recently a replicated study that found that therapists don’t improve in their client outcomes over time. So on average, in fact, most therapists tend to get slightly worse in their outcomes across their career. So this Goldberg study, I think, was between 17 or 18 years of therapist careers, tracking their outcomes, and identified that they didn’t get better. Their clients didn’t improve. Their client outcomes didn’t improve, I should say. This was independent of licensure, education, their approach, gender, age, profession. So whether you are a social work, counseling, marriage and family therapy, we’re all in the same boat here, clinical psychology.

Adam Jones:

We’re finding that therapists aren’t just getting better with time, right? So experience isn’t the one thing that improves client outcomes. But the thing we do find is that people’s confidence tends to increase, right? So the more familiar we get with something, the more we practice it, we start to feel really confident in our abilities as therapists. We see that it works for some clients, we start to think that we’re very effective and so what we find is we actually tend to overestimate how effective we are as therapists. So our confidence tends to go up, but our outcomes actually tend to plateau pretty early. So what about grad students? Some of you probably remember feeling like this little fellow here, feeling like you were drowning as a graduate student, wondering, “I don’t know how to do this,” and then somebody showing you that it’s maybe not so bad. And we get pretty comfortable early on.

Adam Jones:

And the outcomes of graduate students actually tend to plateau pretty early. And this was unverified. I actually had a conversation with Scott Miller just a couple of weeks ago who’s done a lot of work in this therapy outcome research. And he told me that therapist outcomes tend to put plateau pretty early. Maybe in the chat we can take a second and guess. After about how much time do you think graduate students’ effectiveness really tends to kind of plateau, that they kind of flatten out and we get a really good sense of how effective they’ll be as a therapist? Any thoughts? We have one year after graduation, maybe year or two post grad.

Adam Jones:

Good. Yeah. So we have the 50 hours. So I might be bumping into somebody else has heard that. That’s the thing that I had heard too, it was 50 hours, which shocked me. So I actually don’t have a citation for that one. I’m still trying to find it. That may come from the big Orlinsky study where they’ve done a lot to track therapist development over the course of their careers and compare those with outcomes. But I’ll look to find if I can find the actual source for that. So why don’t we get any better? After just 50 hours of clinical services, we have a pretty good sense of how effective graduate students are going to be, but graduate students are tired. They’re managing maybe coursework on top of their clinical work. They’re just getting used to people hurling their problems at them, managing some of the self of the therapists factors that come up in their work.

Adam Jones:

So there’s a lot going on for a graduate therapist, but I think this is a really crucial time to be able to understand what the experience of a graduate therapist is because if you think about it, this is the only time, most likely the only time when a therapist will be getting very direct feedback on their work. So some of the ways that I’ve transitioned my teaching of the masters and doctoral students I work with is to focus on helping give them a trajectory of success that will carry them through their career, helping them recognize what their work is, how effective they are, and ways that they can continue to build a system for improving those outcomes throughout their career. And that’s one of the things that I really look for as I’m working with graduate students, to see if they have a way of evaluating their own success and finding ways to get better.

Adam Jones:

So how do we teach people to be therapists or to be therapeutic, right? Some of the more common avenues that we might use are video review, live supervision, case consultation. During coursework, we may do a lot of role plays to give them experience trying out some of these different ideas, different skills. One of the challenges with role plays is they’re not very reliable. I find that a lot of my graduate students are very bad actors and so it’s difficult to really simulate a live, real therapy session through some of those role plays and to evaluate some student skills. I had a student do a safety assessment, suicide assessment a couple of weeks ago, probably a couple months ago. And they were role playing with another student and they started to make a safety plan and said, “What can we do to keep your mind occupied?” And I had given them each a scenario with a bunch of ideas, and the other student said, “Well, I can go on walks. I can talk to my siblings. I can do this, I can do this.”

Adam Jones:

And they had a list of probably 10 coping skills that they thought they could implement. And despite my direction to make the therapist work for it a little bit, sometimes these role plays may not be as effective as we think they might be. So the nice thing is GoReact can be useful in using a couple of different modalities and approaches to improving therapist skills. But let’s talk a little bit about why therapists aren’t getting better. One is they don’t need what we think they need, right? I really liked the comments talking about therapeutic alliance, but sometimes we spend a lot more time on models, we tend to spend a lot more time on self of the therapist than really getting an idea of what people’s work might look like. So sometimes we don’t see what their work is. They don’t really have a lot of clarity on how or what they should do to improve.

Adam Jones:

And sometimes they don’t have a real clear theory for how they should improve. So Daryl Chow has the seven… I like his list of the seven deadly sins of supervision. So you might see here that some of these things that come up in supervision with graduate students that can really impact how effective our training is with them. So let me talk just briefly about what this idea of deliberate practice is. I know some of you mentioned you’re familiar with it. Others may not be. What deliberate practice is it comes from a line of research from K. Anders Ericsson who studied excellence in a variety of different fields, whether that was music, medicine, chess, different sports. He looked at what it is that separated the highest performers from average or underperforming folks and the overwhelming finding was this idea of deliberate practice.

Adam Jones:

Now, what deliberate practice is it integrates these four elements, having individualized learning objectives, getting feedback from multiple sources… Getting feedback, whether that’s tracking your performance or tracking outcomes, or getting feedback from other people, and then successfully working on refining specified skills that are targeted toward improving those outcomes. And all of this is kind of centered around the use of a coach. So there is some preliminary evidence about deliberate practice. It’s not necessarily a fun thing. Think of it as working out at the gym. It is something that is meant to be a practice. It’s what happens outside of the therapy room. So we do have some good studies that are starting to come out. One that I really like is the study by Daryl Chow, which was kind of the first one to really identify and look at what people were doing outside of their therapy sessions and they found that people who regularly engaged in deliberate practice activities had significantly better outcomes than those who didn’t.

Adam Jones:

So there are a couple of steps to this that I think can be helpful in kind of framing what education might look like with deliberate practice. First is establishing a baseline. So when we talk about establishing a baseline with graduate students, we want to look at their outcomes. So outcome monitoring, I know that one came up a little bit, looking at understanding what their facilitative interpersonal skills are. And I actually do have a slide about that in a little bit, but that term facilitative interpersonal skills comes from Tim Anderson’s work. Ben Ogles, who’s on here, was involved in that I know, which really focused on identifying specific skills have been empirically validated as evidence based skills related to client outcomes.

Adam Jones:

So the facilitative interpersonal skills are a very important way for you to be able to understand what a student’s baseline is in their performance. Targeting and then developing targeted learning objectives. So with targeted learning objectives, it’s important to understand that there are different kinds of practice. So we talk about naive practice, which is this idea of, “Well, if I just do something more and more, then I’ll get better at it.” So just thinking that therapy is practice is kind of naive. It’s actually, kind of like I mentioned earlier, that doesn’t necessarily improve our outcome. So we don’t necessarily get better with experience.

Adam Jones:

Some of the other practices that we’re seeing a lot come out now about that have a lot to do with purposeful practice, which is I’m going to teach specific skills or maybe a therapeutic concept or a concept from a model, a therapeutic intervention from a specific model and we’re going to practice those skills until I feel comfortable with it. That’s this idea of purposeful practice, which has a big place in graduate education. We need people to really be able to walk before they can run. And so purposeful practice can be helpful in building a therapeutic identity and a sense of comfort in the room, but it’s really only this idea of deliberate practice, which integrates all of those elements I mentioned earlier of feedback, having targeted objectives, and the use of coaches, it’s only through that type of practice that we really see improvement in therapist outcomes. So when we’re talking about deliberate practice, it’s very important to identify what are skills just outside of the therapist’s current ability, what are the things that they can do with a little bit of help? Right?

Adam Jones:

And I’ll give some examples of that as we go on, but we want to find really that sweet spot where we can challenge therapists to reach just a little bit further. This last step is practice refinement, engaging in a number of activities that can help improve their abilities with those targeted objectives that they’ve identified, and then monitoring those, keeping track of those as we go forward. So I was engaged in some research with Daryl Chow who is with the International Center for Clinical Excellence. We looked at some people’s deliberate practice with the feedback of a coach and found that through this deliberate practice people are able to improve in some of the facilitative interpersonal skills that we were able to measure in therapeutic interactions.

Adam Jones:

So we’re working on finishing up that manuscript and getting it submitted. So there are some other useful resources. Scott Miller has a book on this, Tony Rousmaniere. So there’s also a book edited by Tony Rousmaniere and some others about integrating deliberate practice and supervision and training. So these are some really useful resources, and there are a number of new books and articles coming out on the topic as well. So it’s an exciting time. We’re really starting to see kind of a shift in how people are approaching graduate education and therapist development in general. That’s just a brief introduction into deliberate practice, but I want to talk just a few minutes here to talk about how I use GoReact for deliberate practice and I’m going to share my screen here.

Adam Jones:

So GoReact has a number of benefits that were really helpful for us. One is GoReact is HIPAA compliant. So you can record therapy sessions. Don’t worry, this therapy session is a vignette with actors. So I don’t have real clients on here, but we’ve been able to record our therapy sessions with GoReact. You can also record virtual sessions. It has a screen sharing capability where you can capture virtual sessions as well. And alternatively, if you have other systems where you record therapy sessions, it’s very easy to upload those recordings into GoReact for assignments. But like I mentioned, GoReact has the ability, if you have a therapy session, you can come in and you can add feedback to a supervisee’s video and it’s time stamped in the video.

Adam Jones:

So if I give feedback here and I give feedback at another point in the video, I can click on my comment and the therapist can go in and click on that specific spot in the session and know exactly what my feedback is addressing. That was one of the most difficult things for me in supervision, was it can be really difficult to review people’s videos and either I had to write down times or had to go fishing through the video to find where it was that I saw the skill that they could work on. So GoReact makes it much more efficient to be able to identify moments in the video that they can work on. You can also use markers, and I’m glad folks mentioned the facilitative interpersonal skills. If I see a skill that I’d like them to work on, rather than typing it out, I can just use my marker and say, “I want you to work on rupture repair and this is the spot in the video where I’ll have you do that.” Or empathy or engaging in hopefulness, persuasiveness, right?

Adam Jones:

And we can talk about the different skills that they would like to use. So the facilitative interpersonal skills, they’re very helpful for individual therapy. Their conceptualization pretty much is primarily focused on individual therapy. So we’re actually developing another measure right now for systemic therapy, relational therapy that we’re developing right now and we’re planning to test, but there are a number of resources out there. So you can record feedback, you can type in the feedback, you can give video feedback or audio feedback, which is really nice, but there are a number of other assignments that you can do with GoReact that can be very helpful in improving outcomes.

Adam Jones:

For example, one thing I’ll do with students is I’ll give them a vignette, a recorded vignette with actors, and they can watch that vignette. Tony Rousmaniere has on his website a lot of little vignettes that you can try. They kind of vary in degree of difficulty. I have some vignettes of relational therapy that I have as well that I’ll share with students and they can… And so with students, I find this to be much more reliable than a role play because they’re all getting the exact same stimulus. So I know exactly what they were watching and so I can evaluate their skills on a specific element. So we can pull up the video, they can watch it, they record their response, and then I can give them their own rubric to go through and evaluate their own skills and abilities.

Adam Jones:

You can have peer rubrics where they go through and evaluate each other’s videos. Or there are instructor rubrics, where you can go in and give them feedback on their work. If I think they’re really struggling with something, I can pull up my library here and say, “Hey, I think this session with Insoo Kim Berg is a really nice one that you might look at.” And I can share the video. The link is in there, takes them straight to YouTube, and they can watch that session to see, so I can demonstrate some of the skills that I want them to improve in.

Adam Jones:

Let’s see. There are role play assignments, which can be very helpful. The nice thing about these is setting up any assignment in GoReact is very simple, but there are group recording sessions, and this essentially operates as a webinar. This interfaces with Canvas or Blackboard or other LMSs that are out there. And so a group of students can hop on and maybe two of them are the clients and one of them is the therapist, and they can have a mock session and record that and save that. And I can go in and give them feedback. They can give each other feedback on how they can improve their work. With GoReact you can also… Something I’ll have them do early on is to study videotapes of expert therapists, especially if they’re really struggling to identify kind of what their therapeutic style might look like.

Adam Jones:

I have them identify therapists that they’ve liked watching before and try to get a sense of what types of questions do they ask. They can upload videos. If they have a video through another service, like psychotherapy.net or something like that, they can screen share that video in GoReact. And so they can watch it and then pause it and then talk about what they’re seeing in the expert video. They can upload YouTube videos and it pulls the video right in here if there are videos of people doing therapy in YouTube that they want to watch and practice some of the skills themselves. Not only can they watch the video, but they can pause it, record themselves practicing that skill and then I can go in and just watch their practice and see how they’re practicing those skills with those expert videos.

Adam Jones:

The other nice thing that I mentioned is you can have the group meetings, which are essentially a webinar chat. It works very much like Zoom, and because it’s HIPAA compliant, we hold our supervision meetings, if we have virtual supervision. We don’t do this much anymore, but especially through the pandemic, we would hold supervision meetings through GoReact where we could get together and talk about our cases. So those are a few things that I find are really helpful in, one, identifying where therapists need to improve. You can go through and look through all of the feedback they’re getting from their faculty members and identify what’s your baseline here and where are the areas where you want to be able to improve going forward. We can use it for supervision, but we can use it for more directed video review and role play activities.

Adam Jones:

So that’s just a brief overview. I know I’m kind of short on time. I went a little over, however long I wanted to present. So I’ll kind of cut it off there, but I want to save some time to go over questions from everybody while we have some time.

Cherokee Lee:

Yeah. Thank you so much, Adam. I have just been drinking this in, I’ve been taking notes actually on my end, just because I’ve been really fascinated. While you guys are thinking of your questions, I just wanted to thank you for bringing up the idea of the different practices. I don’t know if I’m saying this correctly, but the different practices that you’re utilizing, meaning naive, maintenance, purposeful, deliberate with which of course deliberate is the most intentional of all of them. So I definitely want to sit down and research that and figure out what kind of outcomes I’m looking for in my practices and work on that. So thank you. I saw one question come through so far and it was upvoted. It says, “Source for graduate therapist effectiveness.” I guess that it’s just asking… Oh, go ahead.

Adam Jones:

Yeah. So a lot of the outcome monitoring research has been done with graduate students or graduate clinics. And so we have a lot of different literature on some of those. Michael Lambert has published a number of articles on that topic. David Orlinsky has some articles in there. So there are a number of articles there, and if you want to email me directly, I could send some of them over that specifically included graduate students and looked at their effectiveness.

Cherokee Lee:

Awesome. Looks like the next question is, “Do you use GoReact through a learning management system as assignments or independently?”

Adam Jones:

Great. It’s a little tricky. Right now, I use both. We use Canvas, but because we’ll also record client videos in GoReact, I don’t do that through Canvas. So I don’t have the students login through Canvas to go into GoReact and record some of their therapy sessions. So right now we’re kind of using a mix of both. But when I use GoReact in our classrooms, we’re primarily using it through Canvas, which it integrates really nicely. If you’re grading something in GoReact using a rubric in GoReact, it will automatically import the scores into Canvas and we’ll pull those grades into the grade book.

Cherokee Lee:

Awesome. Let’s see. “How do your students record their sessions?”

Adam Jones:

Good. Well, we have students placed at a variety of internship sites. So different internship sites record sessions in different ways so not all of our students are recording using GoReact. Some of them have a recording system at their internship site that they use, but they can then take the videos from that and upload them to GoReact for certain assignments. But other students who do record their sessions on GoReact, they either have a camera in the room that they can connect through GoReact, or they bring their laptop in the room and they set that up on the side of the room or an iPad and they set it up and record their sessions. So GoReact used to have a really useful app for recording.

Adam Jones:

I don’t know if they still have that, but that’s a pretty nice feature as well. Let’s see. “And if they’re doing Telehealth, can they recording in that platform and upload?” Yes. So if you are doing Telehealth, you could… Some people use like SimplePractice and they’ll record it in SimplePractice and then pull it into GoReact. Or what we will just do is they’ll have the session going on in SimplePractice or Doxy.me or something like that. They’ll have the therapy session going on and they’ll share their screen with GoReact and so they’ll capture the screen and be able to capture that video, the Telehealth session directly into GoReact. And so that’s where they’ll save the video. So for example, SimplePractice, it’s pretty costly to be able to record those sessions. So this is kind of a workaround that if you already have GoReact, that you don’t have to pay for the additional recording in another space.

Cherokee Lee:

Wonderful. Good questions. It looks like the next one is, “In what clinical context do your students record sessions, on campus site, placement sites?”

Adam Jones:

So we use right now on campus site and placement sites. However, we are transitioning away from GoReact at our on campus site just because we have… There’s a long story there, but GoReact didn’t quite meet the hardware that we had on our on campus site. So I’ve actually had other conversations with GoReact. I know they are developing and trying to figure out ways that they can be useful in video recording in some of those on campus settings. But right now we’re using it in both, but our on campus site, we won’t be using it as often.

Cherokee Lee:

Wonderful.

Adam Jones:

Yeah.

Cherokee Lee:

Let’s see. The next question is, “As I understand deliberate practice, the feedback and practice would be repetitive and closely linked in time. Do you find providing feedback asynchronously on a recording has the same benefit?”

Adam Jones:

Good question. So these are some of the assignments that I will give them. What I will have them do is I’ll give them essentially a protocol to repetitively practice a specific skill, and they can record that entire practice. So I’ll have them maybe do a one hour session of deliberate practice where we will work together to identify a skill and they will repetitively practice that skill over the course of an hour. I have them set a timer and I have them take a break in between if they’re getting overwhelmed or frustrated.

Adam Jones:

So there is a big element and I didn’t get into that too much, but there is a big element of teaching them how to practice. So helping them identify internally, if they’re starting to get frustrated, or if they’re not seeing that it’s getting any better or they’re just starting to get worse, we have to teach them to take a break, come back to it and keep going. And so we have them do that in about hour long sessions, and then in supervision, we get together and we review those. So those are part of their assignments for the class, is they have to engage in so many deliberate practice activities throughout the course of the semester. And then we review those in supervision to identify what they’re going to do in their next deliberate practice activity. Maybe it’s the same skill. Maybe it’s a new skill. Hopefully that answers the question. So with the feedback being asynchronous, it can slow that down a little bit, but we do try to integrate that as much as we can.

Cherokee Lee:

Awesome. It looks like there was a follow up to a question that we had earlier. The original question was, “In what clinical context do your students record sessions on campus site or placement sites?” And then the follow up questions to that were, “Could you speak to those challenges and why not? We’re looking to adopt at our university and would be interested in unanticipated challenges, particularly for our onsite clinic.”

Adam Jones:

Good. So yeah, if you’re planning on using this in an on campus clinic, one of the big challenges, and I’ve given GoReact this feedback before, is that you can’t schedule sessions In GoReact. So that’s one difficulty we’ve had, is if you’re jumping from one session to another and you’re having to set up the recording in each room, it can really slow down the time between sessions, which already in on campus clinics, you’re sharing rooms and so you’re in one room and then you may have to hop out because somebody else needs that room and then you’re in another room. So if you’re in, you only have a few minutes in between sessions and especially if your session goes long, then you’re slowing everybody down.

Adam Jones:

So having the time to set up the recording without a scheduling feature has been difficult for us. It hasn’t been so bad with our Telehealth sessions because they’re already happening virtually on a computer and so setting that up on GoReact is very simple. It’s really quick. But now that we’ve transitioned into being back in person, that has been one of the challenges that we’ve really come up against. And then more of a technical challenge that we’ve had is while we have cameras mounted in our clinics, we haven’t been able to record on more than one camera at a time from the same computer. So you would virtually need a dedicated computer for each room to be able to record multiple sessions at a time.

Adam Jones:

So those are some of the technical problems. If you want to reach out, I’d be more than happy to talk about some of the challenges that we’ve come up against with the way GoReact works right now. But it works really well if they can just bring in an iPad or a laptop, set it up in the corner of the room. It’s a little invasive. Some clients get a little strange with that, and it might be a little bit of a risk if somebody knocks it, but if they can set up the iPad in the corner of the room and just hit start, then it makes it pretty seamless. So feel free to reach out. I’d be happy to discuss that more.

Cherokee Lee:

Yeah. On our end too, you’re more than welcome to contact us through our website. We’re happy to talk through possible solutions to that as well. Are there any other questions? I haven’t seen any others come through, but I’ll give it just maybe a few more seconds.

Adam Jones:

I saw Marv’s comment. So it looks like the app is up and running. So it looked like it was down for a little bit, but I’m glad to hear that it’s working again.

Cherokee Lee:

Great. Thanks, Marv. Looks like Colleen is asking if you can add your contact info again, please.

Adam Jones:

Yes. Let me put that in the chat right now. Well, if I can find it…

Cherokee Lee:

Also, this will be on demand on our website later. If you go onto our website and click on Resources and see webinars, this will be added there as well and you can find his information there again as a reference. Okay. Well, thank you so much, Adam. We’re just so glad that you came here today and took all that time to talk to us and to prepare. And like I said, it was really engaging for me and I really loved a lot of what I was learning. So I’m excited to listen to it again and to really dig into this. And thank you to our audience for coming today. As a thank you, we actually did a random drawing for an AirPods giveaway, and it looks like the person who won is Marlise Lawn. So we’ll be reaching out to you to get those sent out. But for now, thank you so much. Feel free, again, to look at our webinars online. And we just hope to hear from you again soon. Thank you so much, Adam. We’ll see you.

Adam Jones:

Yeah, no problem. Thanks, everyone.

Cherokee Lee:

Thank you.

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