Nursing Education

Innovation in Nursing Education: Utilizing Video Feedback for Clinical Judgment

A webinar featuring Patrick Luna from the University of Colorado

Patrick Luna, Senior Instructor of Clinical Teaching at the University of Colorado, shares how he prepares students for the realities of nursing practice by using video feedback to help improve their clinical judgment and clinical decision-making skills.

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Patrick Luna:

So like Heather was saying, my name is Patrick Luna. I am a senior instructor of clinical teaching at the University of Colorado College of Nursing. What I specialize in is instructing skills, simulation and also didactic education.

Patrick Luna:

My goal is to create a foundation of nursing practice for first semester BSN nursing students.

Patrick Luna:

So, I’m starting a lot of this conversation. I’m introducing a lot of these concepts in more of a scaffolded approach. My main objective is to translate knowledge to practice. We all know the inherent challenges in this sort of objective.

Patrick Luna:

Recently, like we were hearing about in our last session, regulatory agencies in our field are now acutely focused on how we go about preparing our students for the realities of nursing practice.

Patrick Luna:

This has led to regulatory standards that will require that nursing educators evaluate clinical judgment.

Patrick Luna:

What we are going to discuss during my time with you today, is utilization of an innovative tool that allows me to teach and evaluate clinical judgment. So, let’s get started.

Patrick Luna:

All right. So a discussion on teaching clinical judgment starts with identifying a purpose. Inherently, we cannot teach a student to make a clinical decision, when they are sitting in a chair in a classroom.

Patrick Luna:

This is apparent when we define clinical judgment as a conclusion, that’s drawn from clinical reasoning, that involves a planned response.

Patrick Luna:

This definition involves an action. Students must directly practice what they have learned. So, any approach must be multimodal and involve various pedagogies and strategies.

Patrick Luna:

We also can’t expect students to demonstrate this competency at the beginning of their program. This concept must be scaffolded and began with the foundational application of knowledge and skills.

Patrick Luna:

The first problem that arises as a result of this realization is that no single faculty member and for that matter, no single course can accomplish this independently.

Patrick Luna:

This is a program-wide objective, to teach students how to safely and effectively practice sound clinical judgment. As educators, if we can identify what the objective is in our course to scaffold the clinical judgment, then we can more effectively stay in our lane. We can assist students with reaching the next level in the process. This fits in line with what we all know about what competency-based education is.

Patrick Luna:

For example, I teach a foundations of nursing course. The students come to my course with a basic knowledge of assessment and patho. It is my objective to assist them in utilizing the data that they collect from their assessment. It is the logical next step in the process of clinical decision making.

Patrick Luna:

By the end of my course, the student should be able to formulate a plan of care for a patient, based on their assessment data. This is the knowledge that they will need to begin making clinical decisions. This is their knowledge base, and then what I have to work with when they come to me.

Patrick Luna:

However, what I just said doesn’t include an action. For this training to be effective, the students must begin to utilize this knowledge.

Patrick Luna:

I do this in various ways, small group work, case studies, role playing, all the active learning things that make a classroom a place where students use the knowledge that they learn. But I can’t do this by myself. Like I was saying, it’s multimodal.

Patrick Luna:

I need clinical instructors to reinforce this knowledge, as students experience nursing in clinical settings.

Patrick Luna:

Simulation is also a key component in this model. This is where students will begin to piece this information together, to sift through multiple points of data and identify what is important to make a decision. This must be a deliberate process.

Patrick Luna:

What I am attempting to do is bridge that academic practice gap. The barriers to this are not only my own, but they exist in my students as well.

Patrick Luna:

We have told them since they started school, that demonstrating knowledge meant getting an A on a multiple choice test. Now I’m telling them that knowing the material is only a component of their training. They must be able to show me that they can correctly utilize what they know.

Patrick Luna:

The regulatory agency that accredits colleges in nursing, like we all know, is the AACN. They publish the Essentials with the 10 domains that nursing programs, we have to integrate into our curriculum.

Patrick Luna:

The 10 domains that will form the basis for our future objectives were translated to educators through eight different concepts. This is located on the AACN websites, in their implementation toolkits.

Patrick Luna:

The first one that they released in January of this year, was the concept of clinical judgment. I don’t think that was an accident. I think that’s the first one that needs to be released. That’s the first one we need to look at, to begin to formulate our plan for how we’re gonna approach this.

Patrick Luna:

Within that document, there’s numerous strategies for achieving the concept. Among the learning strategies were simulation, reflection, concept mapping, OSCEs and a flipped classroom model.

Patrick Luna:

These strategies satisfy multiple domains within the AACN Essentials. And if you look at that document, it does map it out. So, as we start our curricular mapping, we can use that document to kind of help us with that process.

Patrick Luna:

What this revealed to me is that my understanding of the New Essentials as an educator, was better focused on the concepts rather than the domains.

Patrick Luna:

This is from what I call a bedside educator point of view. I’m looking at this through the lens of my courses. And it just seems that focusing on the concepts and the way that they integrate into the multiple domains is just a better place for me to start the conversation. It makes much more sense to me.

Patrick Luna:

This allowed me to view the current strategies that I use, as relevant to achieving this concept. Not reinventing the wheel, just kind of remapping what I’m doing.

Patrick Luna:

In short, we’re doing a lot of this work already. We could not exist within our educational framework with all the challenges that are facing our profession at this moment, without evolving our methods to meet this changing landscape.

Patrick Luna:

This will be the challenge. The main one’s going to be with assessment and evaluation because we need specific strategies for that.

Patrick Luna:

The component that intrigued me the most was the inclusion of validated tools, when going through the toolkit, to evaluate students’ ability to make clinical judgments.

Patrick Luna:

The inclusion of these tools in the form of rubrics and scales, signals that programs will be asked to show learners’ competency in this concept. So, this will be part of our accreditation, starting in 2024. This will be the frontier, in my opinion, that most programs will have to explore.

Patrick Luna:

Integration of these tools will take professional development and a deeper understanding of these tools.

Patrick Luna:

So the AACN, they’re not the only regulatory agency that is challenging nursing educators on the concept of clinical judgment.

Patrick Luna:

The NCSBN, that’s the agency that we all know licenses our nursing students. They embarked on a research-based campaign to address the critical inability for new nurses to make entry level decisions.

Patrick Luna:

If you’ve been to some of those webinars and heard the process for how the new NCLEX was created, they went on a tour, just really explaining what the need was.

Patrick Luna:

The need is, is that there is a critical inability for new nurses to make entry level clinical judgments and decisions.

Patrick Luna:

The result of all their data analysis was a change to the format of the exam questions. What those exam questions now are designed to do, is evaluate the ability of student nurses to make clinical decisions.

Patrick Luna:

The NCSBN presented their evaluation approach using this map here, the clinical judgment measurement model. This is a map for educators to prepare our students for the licensure exam. The questions on the updated exam will be based on this particular model.

Patrick Luna:

What this model tells us is that clinical judgments are linear decisions and they occur in a dynamic setting. This is all reflected in this model.

Patrick Luna:

Anyone who has ever practiced clinically, knows this just fundamentally. That’s the environment we practice at.

Patrick Luna:

The NCSBN has been on a crusade just around the country, to explain this model, so that we as nursing educators can begin to implement this change and prepare for it.

Patrick Luna:

The way that I interpret this model is by using the scaffolded approach that I mentioned earlier. Where should the students be in this process at various levels of my program?

Patrick Luna:

Then that distills down to me again, as a bedside educator, to where do my students need to be at the beginning and then at the end of my course?

Patrick Luna:

In my first semester foundational courses, I concluded I needed to focus on recognizing client needs. That’s right up there on the upper left hand corner.

Patrick Luna:

That’s something I was already doing, but I needed to be more deliberate about it. I needed to explain the concept of clinical judgment. That needed to be defined for my students, to know what that process entailed and teaching students to form a hypothesis based on data. That all is reflected in this model.

Patrick Luna:

I focus mainly on layer three, having students recognize important cues amongst assorted data and taking the relevant information and formulating a hypothesis.

Patrick Luna:

The way that I’ve translated this is, beginning that process of planning care. You can see in this particular model, our tried and true nursing process is right there at the bottom.

Patrick Luna:

That’s going to be our basis, but we can integrate this new concept, just to kind of formulate how we’re going to assess this better.

Patrick Luna:

This is when we get into these validated tools. When you go through the implementation model, you’ll see this one a lot.

Patrick Luna:

So when you look at the clinical judgment toolkit, this one, the Lasater Clinical Judgment Rubric is mentioned multiple times.

Patrick Luna:

It is a validated observational tool. We know that the benefit of observational tools, when it comes to competency based education, it’s specific to nursing practice and it’s designed specifically to evaluate clinical judgment.

Patrick Luna:

When I heard that, I got really excited. I’m like, well, I can just plug in the rubric and start using it. It’s a little more complicated than that because it is a complete, and it’s literally a bird’s eye view of where our student should be as a whole, as from the beginning to the end.

Patrick Luna:

It can’t be used, except for possibly simulation, in that broad scope. So what we need to do, is look at it and see what fits into our course.

Patrick Luna:

So we don’t need to use the whole thing. We need to use the concepts and the descriptors to design our learning experiences. So, that’s how I’m looking at it because we don’t have finished nursing product students, like in my course. So, I had to look at this through a specific lens.

Patrick Luna:

The way that the rubric works, it includes four subscales. It’s based on Tanner’s Clinical Judgment Model. Those include effective noticing, effective interpreting, effective responding and effective reflecting.

Patrick Luna:

So each subscale includes about two to three behavioral dimensions, and they are evaluated based on a four point scale. Those descriptors are anywhere from beginning to exemplary.

Patrick Luna:

So this tool, of course, it’s been rated for content validity and a rate of reliability, and has been the basis for many research projects. So if you look this up, you’ll see it’s used a lot for evaluating clinical judgment in various settings.

Patrick Luna:

What the challenge will be is instituting the principles of this rubric into our evaluation of students.

Patrick Luna:

Again, my approach to this will be to identify the level that my students should be able to demonstrate as foundational first semester nursing students.

Patrick Luna:

Once I have identified the level, I can create formative assessments that will begin the process of scaffolding their clinical judgment, based on this rubric.

Patrick Luna:

What you’ll see is that, it fits in. Whenever we’re talking about the general concept of clinical judgment, Lasater, the clinical judgment measurement model, the information from the AACN, that information overlaps. So, these aren’t independent. It’s the same concept, so a lot of the principles overlap.

Patrick Luna:

So if we can identify that, it’s easier to create evaluations and assessments of our students, because we can include components from all of them that overlap because a lot of them are the same.

Patrick Luna:

For example, at this foundational level, I will focus on the subscale of effective noticing and effective interpreting. That’s a beginner level.

Patrick Luna:

So my instruction will include an introduction to these five dimensions and teaching strategies, to actively engage the students to facilitate growth based on the description of a beginner’s level. What this did, it literally describes what comes into our nursing programs.

Patrick Luna:

The things that we see from an observational basis, when we put our students in these kind of situations, where they need to make a clinical judgment or start to begin to make a clinical judgment, we see the confusion. We see they’re focusing on one thing, that may or may not be relevant.

Patrick Luna:

This was a good descriptor for me, to begin to start that process. How do I keep this going?

Patrick Luna:

What this does is provide a baseline from which my students can grow. It defines it specifically for me. It also helps to define what a beginner is. This is what we can expect when students enter our programs.

Patrick Luna:

The goal should be to guide them to the developing level as they progress in their ability to formulate clinical judgment.

Patrick Luna:

I found that, that was the best utility I can get out of Lasater, was really having some clear definitions for where my students are at various levels.

Patrick Luna:

Of course, some students will enter our program with knowledge of this process, depending on their background. They may be a little bit further along.

Patrick Luna:

Some students will need more facilitation and guidance to progress. The key is to standardize evaluation and to identify what the goal of the evaluation is. So, this is just another tool I could use, but it is one that’s highly recommended by the AACN, according to their toolkit.

Patrick Luna:

We can’t have this conversation from our point of view, from an educator’s point of view, who is hearing all of this information and trying to make sense of it, without talking about innovation. This is where innovation is going to be vital.

Patrick Luna:

In the hands of an innovative educator, these tools and rubrics and all of this, they can be utilized to provide effective teaching and evaluation. We just have to know how to use it. That takes professional development. And then we can start to utilize these tools in an effective way.

Patrick Luna:

As a nursing profession, I think we are beyond asking what all these changes are necessary.

Patrick Luna:

NCLEX pass rates, they’ve dropped all over the country, especially after the pandemic. We are sending our students into an environment that is changing very, very rapidly.

Patrick Luna:

I tell my current students that they are the most consequential cohort of new nurses I’ve seen in my lifetime.

Patrick Luna:

Our institutions, we survived the pandemic. Each of us was asked to operate out of our comfort zone.

Patrick Luna:

To achieve this, we looked at new methods of instruction, new ways to engage students, new ideas to deliver and evaluate our students and new motivation to conceptualize the importance of the work that we do.

Patrick Luna:

We also discovered that a return to normal was a goal that looked different when we got there. It was difficult, but it was energizing. We were forced to change what we did and for a lot of us, that was uncomfortable. But in the end, we learned so much.

Patrick Luna:

It’s not a coincidence that all of these regulatory standards are changing at this very moment. This is the best possible time to ask nursing educators to innovate. We were all just forced to change, whether we liked it or not.

Patrick Luna:

It is our mandate to in innovate. This mandate also exists outside of our regulatory agency and is a response to the dynamic needs of our profession and an entirely new generation of learners. It’s a really good time.

Patrick Luna:

Now, we all have our own ways to tailor learning experiences and innovate in our teaching. My own method has always included finding educational tools that increase my engagement efficiently.

Patrick Luna:

My personal journey in this regard, led me to a tool called GoReact. This is exactly how it happened. I was asked by my director, to find a tool that would allow us to deliver our health assessment course online, while our campus was closed to students.

Patrick Luna:

I required an interface to evaluate assessment skills, and I literally tried everything. First the tools that my college already had available. We had quite a few. And then to numerous educational video interfaces, but nothing had a streamlined method to provide feedback.

Patrick Luna:

That was, until I discovered GoReact. It did exactly what I needed it to do. And as I’ve discovered, it does more.

Patrick Luna:

What it opened to me was the world of providing my students video-based feedback. Now I had a mechanism to provide individualized feedback on any assignment that can be submitted as a video.

Patrick Luna:

What GoReact provides is a streamlined feedback platform. This is to evaluate student video submissions.

Patrick Luna:

I’m not going to go into all the dynamic ways that it enables me to provide feedback, but I will tell you that during the pandemic, I still felt connected to my students.

Patrick Luna:

I was able to use this platform to evaluate their skills and to directly witness their growth. I could see my students implement feedback to directly improve. This is exactly what I needed.

Patrick Luna:

What I didn’t know is that, evaluating assessment skills was only scratching the surface of what I could do with this tool. I’ve learned quite a bit since then.

Patrick Luna:

There are numerous advantages to this method of feedback. It is efficient for my workflow. I don’t normally have time to provide individualized feedback to 120 students in my didactic course. We’re a really large program, here at the University of Colorado.

Patrick Luna:

I can provide feedback on a discussion post or a reflection paper, in about twice the time it takes me to provide feedback in GoReact. It’s that streamlined. I really encourage you to look at it.

Patrick Luna:

I have much more robust conversations with students, regarding their video submissions. We are able to pinpoint specific actions for improvement, that’s based on them submitting a video for evaluation.

Patrick Luna:

I’ve also noticed that students are much more focused on improving in a very concrete way, because we are looking at something, and I can give them direct feedback on what they are doing. They can see what they need to improve, and it’s easier for them to conceptualize the action that they need to take.

Patrick Luna:

This is something that’s kind of individual to me, but I would rather have my students speak than write. I know that I’m going to get a lot of flack on that one, and I already have.

Patrick Luna:

I’m still a bedside nurse and my bedside workflow on a daily basis, doesn’t include me writing an APA paper.

Patrick Luna:

What it does include is speaking with multiple stakeholders, regarding a client’s care. Doing this effectively is an essential skill in any nursing environment.

Patrick Luna:

My students need focused feedback to improve on this, especially very early on in their program. And I take every opportunity to help them in this regard, as they are going through their foundational training.

Patrick Luna:

My students, the way I do this is provide case studies and prompts. But instead of writing a response, I have them record an oral response, while adhering to a rubric. So, this has really streamlined my workflow.

Patrick Luna:

This method of feedback can be utilized for various assignments and evaluations. I’ve found it effective for feedback and evaluation of psychomotor skills, communication techniques.

Patrick Luna:

It was originally a communication tool, which I found out. So, it’s tried and true with improvement communication.

Patrick Luna:

I can use it for case studies. I can do reflection assignments on it. I use it for small group work. We are beginning to integrate it in our simulation program, to provide feedback. This is a valuable tool in any active learning environment.

Patrick Luna:

The screenshot you see right here, it shows both typed and video feedback in a GoReact assignment. There’s also an option to record audio feedback as well.

Patrick Luna:

This is a big reason why I felt connected to my students during in the pandemic, is they were still able to see me provide them feedback. I just did it through this unique interface. Something that I’ve really enjoyed doing is having them see me when I provide feedback.

Patrick Luna:

So using video feedback for clinical judgment, it’s only one of the many educational tools that can assist nursing educators with the transition to competency-based evaluation.

Patrick Luna:

There is a specific approach that I take when evaluating clinical judgment. I must accept that innovation is difficult. That’s what I attempt to create in my learning experience. It might not work. I will accept failure as a learning opportunity and strive to improve.

Patrick Luna:

What I’ve learned is, I need to give myself the same grace that I’ve been giving to my students during the pandemic. However, I may create something that helps to bridge the gap between academia and clinical practice. And in that sense, it would be a success. I cannot be risk averse, if my goal is to create something that has meaning.

Patrick Luna:

Next, I’ll connect my evaluation to an objective in my course. This allows me to tailor my assessment to the level of my students.

Patrick Luna:

I can connect this objective to tools that define what the expected competency level of my students should be at their level.

Patrick Luna:

Now, I use the clinical judgment measurement model. I use Lasater. I use all those tools, available to me. This helps me to understand what the standards should be for my students, at their particular level.

Patrick Luna:

My goal is to stay in my lane, to facilitate student growth to a point that can be scaffolded as they progress in the program.

Patrick Luna:

The validated tool that I’ll use is the Lasater Clinical Judgment Rubric. Implementing this tool is an exercise in applying theory to student evaluation. So, like I was saying earlier, it takes some tweaking.

Patrick Luna:

The scope of the Lasater rubric is entirely too broad to apply to specific learning experiences as written. So, I focus on the individual dimensions that are described in Lasater and the descriptions of competency, to formulate rubrics for my assignments.

Patrick Luna:

This is an example. This is an example of a rubric that I use to evaluate clinical judgment principles. This rubric is based on a three-point scale and is based on the Lasater Clinical Judgment Rubric and also the clinical judgment measurement model and the nursing process, which is a huge objective in my course.

Patrick Luna:

Both the Lasater rubric and the clinical judgment measurement model emphasize an ability to identify relevant information.

Patrick Luna:

This assignment is loaded with data, and you’ll see that in a minute. The students must sift through all the data and create a specific plan of care. To do this, they have to filter the information through clinical reasoning.

Patrick Luna:

This is only one component of this evaluation. It gives me an opportunity to provide students feedback on what is important information, based on their chosen plan of care.

Patrick Luna:

There is no right answer, like in a multiple choice test. They must choose their own path and rationalize their decisions in their response.

Patrick Luna:

This is just an example of what the prompt is. The assignment states, using the patient information provided, verbalize a plan of care for the client. You will record your verbal response in GoReact. There is a three minute time limit on your video. Videos that go over that time will not be evaluated.

Patrick Luna:

The response will be evaluated, based on the video case study rubric, which we just saw. This is an independent assignment. We are evaluating your individual ability to construct a coherent plan of care, based on a client’s scenario.

Patrick Luna:

There is no more information available for this client. You must make a clinical decision, based on the information that you are given.

Patrick Luna:

Like you see here, there’s tons of data in this scenario, including an update on the client that shows them a video of the client in respiratory distress, right there at the bottom.

Patrick Luna:

I don’t limit them on what path they should take, only that they have to present a coherent plan. So, this is exciting to me. Grading this assignment doesn’t feel like work. It reminds me why I wanted to be an educator and keeps me focused on my purpose.

Patrick Luna:

I’m a facilitator that guides my students on a path to becoming safe, effective care providers. A strong foundation in clinical judgment principles will allow them to translate their clinical experiences into valuable opportunities for growth.

Patrick Luna:

This occurs outside of my direct influence. It allows students to chart their own path and incorporate their own talents into their nursing care.

Patrick Luna:

Innovation in care will allow students to meet the dynamic challenges of our changing profession.

Patrick Luna:

So, the streamlined video feedback interface available through GoReact, that’s what made this assignment possible. I never would’ve created this without having a clear method for evaluating and assessing my students.

Patrick Luna:

So the streamline video feedback interface available through GoReact, it’s made that assignment possible.

Patrick Luna:

I use GoReact for formative and summative assessments. I can speak at length, about the value of all kinds of educational technology tools.

Patrick Luna:

What we need to do is, once we have these tools in the hands of an innovative nursing educator, a tool GoReact and a method like video feedback, we can really use these tools to bridge the academic practice gap.

Patrick Luna:

If you go to the AACN website, they’ve asked for educational technology companies to partner with them, so that we as educators, are aware of tools that can help us with this transition.

Patrick Luna:

My students, they’ve just felt more engaged with me, using interfaces like this. My content, based on individualized feedback, I am able to give them this through this interface.

Patrick Luna:

Even though it’s on a video interface, I get much more one on one time with them. I highly recommend you check it out.

Patrick Luna:

Just to wrap everything up, we must approach the academic practice gap with focused strategies, to meet our new regulatory standards and to prepare our students for practice.

Patrick Luna:

Theoretical models and rubrics, as well as the AACN implementation toolkits, they’re guides that can be translated to our evaluations. This is going to take professional development, but it’s also going to take vision.

Patrick Luna:

It’s an exciting time to be a nurse educator. Our mandate is to innovate, and this will prepare our profession for the dynamic challenges of the nursing profession. It’s going to help to prepare our students.

Patrick Luna:

Finally, video feedback, along with other technology tools, can be valuable allies as we approach all the imminent changes in our profession.

Patrick Luna:

Thanks so much for your time today. I’m looking forward to the keynote speaker. I think we’ll turn it over to questions now. I’m going to stop sharing.

Speaker 2:

Thank you, Patrick. I love watching your presentations. I always learn something new. We do have one question from Beverly. She’s asking if you require students to self-assess for every assignment.

Patrick Luna:

Yeah. Like many of you, I was just captivated by what I just heard regarding that, in the previous presentation. I was taking furious notes, to see how I can implement this.

Patrick Luna:

I do know that within GoReact, there is the specific student rubric. So for my psychomotor skills, I have the students both do peer feedback.

Patrick Luna:

Peer feedback is really essential, especially given the size of my nursing program. I lean on peer feedback quite a bit, as well as self-assessment.

Patrick Luna:

So before they turn in, especially their summative assessments, I have them peer review it. I look at that rubric, as well as my own, when I’m grading.

Patrick Luna:

So, I’ve implemented it, soft implemented it. But I do know and realize now, that competency-based education relies on it. So, I need to increase.

Patrick Luna:

I’m going to look for a lot more opportunity for that. I’m going to look for a lot more resources on how to do that. So, I appreciate the suggestion. I’m on it, but I’m at the beginning stages of it.

Speaker 2:

Thank you. Let’s see. We’ll give it just another moment, see if any other questions come up, Patrick.

Speaker 2:

While we’re waiting for some questions to come in, you and I have talked. Have you started pulling reports for rubrics now that…

Patrick Luna:

Yes, I have. I use GoReact. I use it in didactic. I use it in my simulation lab. I use it in my skills lab.

Patrick Luna:

Heather, she is my connection, with showing me new methods of truly utilizing the tool, because there’s so much in it that I didn’t even know about.

Patrick Luna:

What Heather told me, was that I can pull rubric reports for all my assignments. So, what I’ve started to do is, I’ve been collecting data on my evaluations. I have graphs and everything. Everything’s kind of laid out for me. I really just have more data than I know what to do with now.

Patrick Luna:

I’m speaking with my instructional designer here. We’re going to start going through this and seeing how we can map this. This is going to help us when I’m going through my individual course and aligning it to the essentials, because now I have more data. We all know data’s great.

Patrick Luna:

So anything that you do within GoReact and any of the rubrics that you create, are connected to a data system that you can use to evaluate your own teaching, evaluate your program.

Patrick Luna:

I didn’t know about it until recently. So, I really appreciate Heather and the team there, telling me about it.

Speaker 2:

Thank you. How has your process with GoReact impacted the amount of time you’re spending in assessment?

Patrick Luna:

This is a huge thing. Because I’ve implemented this, and I was kind of the person that spearheaded this, but this is being used all over my college now.

Patrick Luna:

If it was a time suck, if it was something that had a lot of technical issues, then we wouldn’t be using it. What I can tell you is that, once you start using it, you’ll realize the streamlined interface.

Patrick Luna:

When I say streamlined, you watch the video. And as you’re watching the video, there are multiple methods that you can provide feedback.

Patrick Luna:

I can type. When I start typing, the video stops. I can create a video, which you all saw in my presentation, or I can use audio for it as well.

Patrick Luna:

There’s also markers. So if you are grading a lot of assignments at the same time, like me, that are all the same and you’re giving some of the same feedback, you can create a marker. Click on that, and it puts that feedback into the video. In that sense, the video doesn’t even stop.

Patrick Luna:

The learning curve isn’t that big. So, we’ve saved a ton of time with this and it’s not just me. It’s the people that evaluate these assignments as well, the different courses that we used it in and the different faculty that have adopted.

Patrick Luna:

It’s just, I feel like I can provide this individualized feedback without increasing my workload dramatically.

Patrick Luna:

Like I said in my presentation, I would much rather provide that individualized feedback in this method and mode, rather than grade 120 reflection assignments or give feedback that way. I just find it much more engaging, and so do my students.

Speaker 2:

Thank you. Trisha has asked, have other faculty done this in subsequent courses? If so, do you have any insights to share?

Patrick Luna:

Yes. Like I was saying, the reasoning behind the statement in my presentation about, in the hands of an innovative educator these tool can be… it’s literally like the paint in an artist’s… what we use to get across our point. I didn’t say that very eloquently, but I think you get what I mean.

Patrick Luna:

One of the coolest things I’ve seen is our pharm faculty. I don’t teach pharm, but the pharm faculty, it actually has their students within GoReact, create a pharmaceutical commercial.

Patrick Luna:

The students come together in groups, have a rubric that they follow to create, to advertise a medication. They record that and evaluate that within GoReact.

Patrick Luna:

There’s other examples, but that’s one of the coolest ones that I’ve seen, is the pharmaceutical commercial. So, good question.

Speaker 2:

Yes. Great question. Okay. I think that’s all of our questions, Patrick. I appreciate your time. We’ve learned so much. I’m sure we’ll continue to learn from you in future presentations. Thank you again.

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